J Simens.com

Five C’s of Singapore… oops make that six


The streets of Singapore can be entertaining for an expat in Asia sooner or later you run into someone you know.  The initial  “you look familiar stare” turns into the “Oh, where did I meet him”, to finally recognition, “Carl?”  It is hard to place someone from your past into a new situation quickly.

Then you have the quick 2-minute talk on the street about where are you living now? How is your family? What are your upcoming plans? Goodbyes and tell your family hello chat. Amazing how quickly you can get into a reconnection if you are both used to doing them.

Singapore is a hub 

Singapore 1989 - Has it changed?

Singapore 1989 – Has it changed?

Singapore has been a base for us since our first international assignment as a family.  It is amazing 28 years later we still do to the same dentist and doctors establishment we used back there. Often when you go to other assignments in this area, you will fly in and out of Singapore to do medical treatments.  I am going to miss Singapore.

We lived in Singapore before we had children and we were a two income family. We thought is was an expensive assignment but we loved it.  We had everything we needed to have fun there.

  1. A pile of cash
  2. credit cards
  3. a car
  4. a condominium
  5. and a club membership

Expats and Dogs make a good combination

We even brought my dog Manaia. He was a black lab.  I got Manaia when I returned back to the USA after teaching on the island of Samoa.

Expats and Dogs Make a Good Combination

Expats and Dogs Make a Good Combination

Each village in Samoa is autonomous and led by a council of matai referred to as the ‘village fono.’ The daughter of a high chief in a village is known as a “taupou” or “sa’o’aualuma” when they perform public ceremonial roles; the male equivalent is known as the “manaia”, or “sa’o’aumaga.” I called my dog Manaia  because he was a “Prince” to me.

Singapore was a fun time for us. Vacations to all areas around Asia and tons of visitors.  It was the first time I learned how to shop during a three week summer holiday to get all that I would need for a whole year. Singapore is a shopping treat for many, but some things were hard to find for my size.

We did all the traditional things like “must have Singapore Slings at the Raffles Hotel.”  The Singapore Sling is a South East Asian cocktail. This long drink was developed sometime before 1915 by Ngiam Tong Boon, a Hainanese bartender working at the Long Bar in Raffles Hotel, Singapore.

We had family and friends all eager to visit us since Singapore is such a step off  point to go to other Asia locations.

Great Friends, Great Locations - Great Memories

Great Friends, Great Locations – Great Memories

Are your global nomads going to be hidden immigrants?

Asia has become a very important part of our family’s background. Our kids might be more drawn to these cultures than they are to the American cultures they never lived in. I believe their identity, their likes and disliked, their beliefs about who they are, are firmly built on their global experiences. When they finally went back to the USA for college they fell into the group called hidden immigrants. They looked like Americans but didn’t know much about being American.

Chopsticks Attempt #1

Chopsticks Attempt #1

My children were exposed to Asia food when they were very young in our own home and where we went out to eat. I believe Jackie had mastered chopsticks by the time she was three years old. Sushi is still one of her favorite meals to eat. One visit to Kansas, my mother, asked what we wanted for dinner. “Lobster and rice”, said Grant. This was our common experience when we’d hit a beach BBQ in Asia. He over heard that grandma might BBQ tonight. So when asked, he went for his ‘go to’ favorite meal.  It did not happen in Northwest Kansas that night.

Being a Farmer means something very different to my son than it does to me

Being a Farmer means something very different to my son than it does to me

I grew up in that area of Kansas and did not move until I was 18 years old.  My version of being a farmer meant growing wheat or  sorghum and corn for grain. It meant being involved in growing hay for the cattle. Grant growing up in Asia had a different viewpoint of what it means to be a farmer.

Grant loved harvesting the fruit we had around our Asian homes. He would get bananas, rambutans, papayas and coconuts out of our yards. He would rattle off the facts about these crops. “Botanically, the coconut fruit is a drupe, not a true nut. It has three layers, the exocarp, mesocarp and the endocarp. (sound familiar). The exocarp and mesocarp make up the “husk” of the coconut. Often coconuts sold in the USA have had the exocarp (outermost layer) removed. The mesocarp is composed of the fiber or hush. Remember it is not a true nut.”

So when you say “farmer”, it does not mean the same thing in our household.

A coconut can float extremely long distances across oceans. I am sure the 2000 American film ‘Cast Away’ seems different to someone who has played a lot with coconuts on beaches than to someone who has not.

Play it forward

I hope when global nomads head out across the world they attack each assignment as one that they might revisit again and again so they make the most out of the situation. Imagine what things would be like if you assumed you might be building connections that would last over 28 years vs. thinking this is a one-off assignment. If I had know that Singapore would have been in my life off and on for this long of time, I would have added a 6th “C” on my Singapore list.

  1. A pile of cash
  2. credit cards
  3. a car
  4. a condominium
  5. and a club membership
  6. Connections and communications

 

Notes:

Child Identity – here is a nice write up about identity that includes some information about TCKs.

The Singapore sling has been documented as early as 1930 as a recipe in the Savoy Cocktail Book; Ingredients ¼ lemon juice, ¼ Dry Gin, ½ Cherry Brandy: “Shake well and strain into medium size glass, and fill with soda water. Add 1 lump of ice”.

Kansas Top Ten Cash Crops:

Wheat, Sorghum, Corn, Soybeans, Hay, Marijuana, Sunflowers, Oats, Beans, Cotton.

Fruits: drupe (or stone fruit) typical drupes include olives, peaches, plums, and cherries. Bramble fruits (such as the blackberry and the  raspberry) are aggregates of drupelets.