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Perfect way to spend a vacation -words by five years olds


thinking child

What can you do when your brain doesn’t match your hand?

A perfect five-year-olds holiday – I hope their parent’s vacation plans matched up to their child’s expectation. (note– child’s spelling as written by them)

  • playing at the beach
  • going to Maine
  • swim in the pool
  • going to McDonalds
  • going to Singapores
  • go on an airplane
  • plaaying
  • going to Bali
  • going to hawwloeen
  • going to holland and the snow
  • going shipping to put food in the hotel rfrigeratr
  • going home ot see my family
  • playng in the sand

I found a random sheet of these words in a file while looking for a “tax” sheet of paper.  It took me right back to my teaching job in Indonesia many years ago.  I wish I had put each child’s name on their personal statement to help with my memory. I do recall asking them ‘What are you looking forward to doing this vacation?”

Now is the perfect time to capture your child’s memory of their recent holiday.  I’d ask them three simple questions:

  1. If we were able to “re-do” one thing again in the vacation, what would you like to experience again?
  2. Since food, smells or sights help us remember the memories, what item do you remember the most about our past vacation?
  3. What emotion would you put on that memory?

I am always sad when I go into a classroom and see –

“My favorite…”  or “The best part of my vacation was…”

I think adults often want the kids to be happy and express emotions that they find enjoyable.  So putting the label as ‘best or favorite’ only allows the child to feel it is possible to be ‘good’ or have ‘happy’ thoughts. What happens if this past vacation wasn’t that way.  What happens if some other emotion is how the child feels about the events?

Remember to be a whole person we need to experience the highs and lows and learn how to deal with them at a young age.

Crayons - around the world

… and the whole range of emotions.

So many parents do not talk about a vacation after it is over. They just move on to the next event coming up. Young children need to reflect on their experiences and to label and file them into their memory.

So many expats take wonderful vacations but don’t take the time to make these lasting memories for their young children. It just becomes something we have done but not a “Memory” to keep. I always encourage families to revisit the holiday so they can capture some of the key things to lock away into a memory.

Here is an example of capturing one of our vacations to the  Cook Islands where we meet up with Grandparents to spend the Christmas Holidays. We were traveling from Jakarta, Indonesia and they were coming from San Francisco, CA, USA.  A story as told by my four-year-old:

  1. If we were able to “re-do” one thing again in the vacation, what would you like to experience again? I’d like to visit Grandpa at the beach again to make those circle of flowers to wear. (circlet of flowers known as an ‘ei katu) We had fun making one for everyone to wear Christmas Day. I made your‘s the prettiest! I loved Rarotonga.
  2. Since food, smells or sights help us remember the memories, what item do you remember the most about our past vacation? I liked the really yellow banana chips that were hot, salty and looked neat with red ketchup on them.
  3. What emotion would you put on that memory? I’d put overjoyed when building flower gifts with Grandpa and tickled when eating!

Med and High emotions

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